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We are Mac lovers at Knapsack but even if we weren’t, I’d still say that the Apple Watch is still Apple’s singular best product. I can say plenty about its other tools – the too-big iPad Pro, the horrible keyboard on the MacBooks, the locked-down iPhone – but the Apple Watch and now the new Apple Watch 5 still “just work.”

We’ve used plenty of watches. We wear mechanicals but we’ve tried and reviewed nearly all the smart watches from popular manufacturers. My takeaway is that anyone can stuff fitness and connectivity into a watch. Only Apple has stuck it into a watch you want to wear.

That isn’t to say we don’t love a beefy Casio or a slim Fitbit. But the Apple watch, in all its lozenge-like glory, is the only product that can double as a fitness device and a boardroom PIM tool. It offers everything at a glance, connects with your phone in ways Android Wear devices have have, and doesn’t look like anything else in the market. In short, it’s a singular product in a crowded space.

The upgrades to the watch should be quite interesting including the new GPS functions and the improved battery life. As it stands the Apple Watch sits perched on your wrist like a waiting daemon, ready to provide you with fitness tracking or a calendar of events. Adding in these new features are icing on the tiny cake.

Even the price – $399 on the low end – comes in under the radar especially considering the lack of features found on similarly priced devices. Apple doesn’t do everything right, but it did make this piece of hardware just about perfect.


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By John Biggs

John Biggs is an entrepreneur, consultant, writer, and maker. He spent fifteen years as an editor for Gizmodo, CrunchGear, and TechCrunch and has a deep background in hardware startups, 3D printing, and blockchain. His work has appeared in Men’s Health, Wired, and the New York Times.