We’ve written about a few different Campfire releases as of late (and even have a pair in for a hands-on review at the moment), many of their models (at least in the price ranges I look at) feature bodies made of plastic. Not that there’s anything wrong with that, but what if you want something perhaps a bit more visually interesting, and maybe more durable, why not the Campfire Audio Saber?

If you couldn’t tell from that lead-in, the Campfire Audio Saber features a metal shell. And it’s not just any old metal shell. No, this is what’s known as damascus steel. Centuries ago, that steel was used in swords of extraordinary strength and sharpness, and lends to the Saber name here. On headphones (in-ear monitors) that’s perhaps not as critical of a concern, but I will easily admit that I really enjoy the look of damascus steel, with the swirls revealing all the layers of folded steel. You know, like a metallic filo dough.

Underneath the damascus shell, you’re back to the ABS shell that Campfire Audio has used all along, and that’s fine. That’s the material that they know how to fit their electronics into, and tune the audio response for (and, in my early testing, it sounds pretty amazing). Still, with that metal jacket on the outside, these will be way more robust than likely anything else you’ve had in your ears. If you want to get a pair, they’re $449 in a limited-edition of 1000. campfireaudio.com

Details from Campfire Audio

  • Specifications
    • 5Hz–19 kHz Frequency Response
    • 94 dB SPL @ 1kHz: 25.4 mVrms
    • 8.2 Ohms @ 1kHz Impedance
  • Features
    • Machined Damascus Steel Lid
    • Matte Black ABS Body
    • Single Balanced Armature Driver (Highs)
    • D6 – 6mm Nano Titanium Diaphragm Dynamic Driver
    • D8 – 8mm Hybrid Beryllium Polymer Diaphragm Dynamic Driver
    • Single Balanced Armature Driver (Highs)
    • Custom Beryllium / Copper MMCX Connections
    • Polished Stainless Steel Spout

By Patrick Kansa

A big data developer and leader with a penchant for gadgets, books, watches and beverages. You can find my work on WristWatchReview, Knapsack.News, and Slushpile. If you're on Twitter and/or Instagram, you'll find me there as @PatrickWatches.

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