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While playing games online can have appeal, there’s something about that tactile experience of sitting around a table with friends, rolling lots of math rocks (aka dice) to figure out what in the world is going on in the story you’re building. Well, why not bring some of that online flash into your game with Pixels Dice?

On one hand, Pixels Dice are not that uncommon from any dice you can get from a number of really cool makers out there – balanced, a variety of styles, and even different combinations of sets. But do those other dice have RGB lighting? I didn’t think so!

Yes, that’s right – the Pixels Dice have a small battery, RGB lighting, and some of the coolest disco lighting you’ve ever seen in your click-clacks. They also manage to pack in a bluetooth chip, which means you can program your dice for the color scheme. Not only that, it can communicate with your phone or tablet to report the roll (and, eventually, it’ll be integrated with Roll20 and Foundry, so no more fibbing on those roles in remote play!)

Frankly, the Pixels Dice have a lot going on for them, and the fact that both the hardware AND the software is open source means that these will be quite extensible in the long run (hopefully the rechargeable battery lasts for plenty of cycles). The one downside to all this wonderful TTRPG tech is the pricing – a single die starts at $39 (with a charging case), while a full RPG set of seven dice will set you back $199 (with a bonus die, and charging cases). Not cheap, by any means. However, if you’re looking for a way to spend your stimmy cash, I won’t ask any questions. Just let me give ’em a roll, ok?

The campaign, as you might expect, smashed it’s funding goal when it launched yesterday. Things will be running until April 8th, with the flashy dice expected to deliver in March 2022 (plenty of time for those integrations to be worked out). Check out all the details over at the campaign page.


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By Patrick Kansa

A big data developer and leader with a penchant for gadgets, books, watches and beverages. You can find my work on WristWatchReview, Knapsack.News, and Slushpile. If you're on Twitter and/or Instagram, you'll find me there as @PatrickWatches.