Music formats have been pretty stagnant for a few decades. You’ve got your MP3, your FLAC, even your WAV. And now you have your MOO.

Moodelizer is basically a multitrack audio format that allows for on-the-fly management of volume and tone. The files contain multiple tracks and using the Moodelizer app, for instance, you can bring certain tracks to the fore, trigger tracks with body motions, and even change tracks as they play. Imagine a version of a sequencer or a Garage Band but in a file.

“Social media creators have long enjoyed a growing number of creative tools for visuals but have seen very little development within audio. It’s time to bring musical creativity on par with visual creativity and connect the two for more engaging output. Reactive music does just that; we believe that Moodelizer is perfectly positioned with the music format of the future,” said Moodelizer CEO Mathias Rosenqvist.

I saw a demo of the tech and was a bit skeptical at first. The system only allowed you to bring tracks in and out of a song but you couldn’t control where they began or ended. You could mix in tracks by swiping your finger up and down a slider and then importing the video and music into the social media site of your choice. The system also allows you to punctuate videos and TikToks using a number of techniques including some experimental tools that let you easily start and stop tracks by waving your hand, showing a certain number of fingers, and even dancing. It’s literally a TikTokker’s dream.

The company is doing something interesting with music ownership: they’re releasing custom content from globally-known musicians that are encoded in MOO format. From the release:

One of Moodelizer’s unique advantages is its ownership of its music catalog. Moodelizer owns the only catalog in the world that comes in reactive sound format and with the rights pre-cleared for ease of use. By contrast, licensed music, owned by the major record labels and featured on social media platforms, is still static and non-manipulable, resulting in a fairly flat, one-dimensional musical experience on social media. While other apps out there feature visual effects and filters for your video, Moodelizer focuses on the music and the value it adds when it’s part of the creative process rather than an after-effect.

In general, it’s a clever idea that has plenty of potential. That said, don’t expect to trade your MP3 player for a MOO player any time soon.

By John Biggs

John Biggs is an entrepreneur, consultant, writer, and maker. He spent fifteen years as an editor for Gizmodo, CrunchGear, and TechCrunch and has a deep background in hardware startups, 3D printing, and blockchain. His work has appeared in Men’s Health, Wired, and the New York Times.

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