The Cherry Stream keyboard is simultaneously my favorite Cherry keyboard and my least Cherry favorite keyboard. It’s my favorite because it works so well and it’s exactly what I need when I’m on long Zoom calls or recording podcasts. It’s a low-profile, low-noise mechanical keyboard that is designed primarily for streamers. Why? Because it’s almost silent, or at least far quieter when compared to similar Cherry keyboards.

Why don’t I like it? Because I want a huge, clicky keyboard that sounds like machine gun fire. But, because of my “job” I need a keyboard as good as the Stream but without the booming noise and key feel.

Basically, this is a godsend and also a curse. Because it’s so quiet I’ve found no reason to swap back to a clickier keyboard, which is frustrating. It’s a great product made my a great manufacturer and I’m afraid I might be stuck with it for the long term.

Is the Stream Keyboard worth buying?

The short answer is “absolutely.” When I used to take Zoom calls people would notice my keyboard clacking away. Now, with the stream, I’m able to type as fast as I was able to before but the sound is minimized considerably. Further, the switches, while quiet, are as responsive as similarly-designed mechanical keyboards and they’re springy and extremely comfortable.

The whole low-profile package is very nice and the number pad on the side and macro keys are a bit of gravy on the whole turkey dinner of a keyboard. It’s wireless but features AES-128 encryption between the keyboard and the dongle which means it’s also completely secure. Finally, it has a pair of feet that allows you to put the keyboard at a slant or lay it flat.

The keyboard costs about $40 online and also comes in a package with a wireless mouse. If you’re looking for a low-profile, low-noise keyboard, look no further. If you want to clack away like some Luddite typesetter, however, you might just have to steer clear of this keyboard in case you fall in love.

You can check out the entire set on Amazon for $64.

By John Biggs

John Biggs is an entrepreneur, consultant, writer, and maker. He spent fifteen years as an editor for Gizmodo, CrunchGear, and TechCrunch and has a deep background in hardware startups, 3D printing, and blockchain. His work has appeared in Men’s Health, Wired, and the New York Times.

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