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A new game called Beyond Humanity: Colonies promises to liven up board game night with a little machine learning. Created by a Polish team called Three Headed Monster, the game uses traditional board game mechanics with a few technological smarts.

The team is Kickstarting the project. They describe it thus wise:

In?Beyond Humanity: Colonies, players take on the roles of managers of a new settlement built on a distant exoplanet by refugees from a future Earth that is polluted and overpopulated. As a manager, you will propose and vote on new modules to be built, introduce decrees to define the culture and functionality of the colony, carry out planetary exploration and research to obtain valuable artifacts, gather resources, and gain public support from the colonists.

This is a semi-cooperative game, which means you will have to cooperate to keep the colony operational and self-sufficient, while at the same time competing to gain influence and make decisions on the direction of the colony’s development based on your individual victory goals. If the colony fails, you all lose, but if it succeeds, there will only be one true winner.

Beyond Humanity: Colonies?is a hybrid board game like you’ve never seen before: it is an unprecedented combination of a traditional board game combined with electronic miniatures that are supported by a linked app.

The Core Box costs $225 – pricey for a game but not for an electronic product – and it will ship in September 2020. We will request a review unit and give you a closer look at it as they approach the ship date.


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By John Biggs

John Biggs is an entrepreneur, consultant, writer, and maker. He spent fifteen years as an editor for Gizmodo, CrunchGear, and TechCrunch and has a deep background in hardware startups, 3D printing, and blockchain. His work has appeared in Men’s Health, Wired, and the New York Times.